Archivo para la categoría ‘Air Jordan 1’

Air Jordan 1 “Royal” 2013 VS. 2017 Comparison

How many of you are planning on picking up the return of the Air Jordan 1 “Royal” on April 1st? I’m sure a lot of you guys answered yes, and for good reasoning too.

Jordan Brand is finally giving us a remastered release of the Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG “Royal” as they continue to bring back legendary original Air Jordans.

Last seen in 2013, the classic Air Jordan 1 will return in its OG high-cut that’s dressed in the traditional Black and Varsity Royal color scheme. The shoe features a clean Black leather upper with Royal overlays on the toe, heel and Nike Swoosh logos. Staying true to its heritage, the release will also come with OG Nike Air branding on the tongue and outsole.

Similar to recent remastered reissues, this Air Jordan 1 release compared to the 2013 version will come with better quality. Featuring a mix of smooth and premium textured leather that’s dressed in the OG Black and Varsity Royal with Nike Air branding throughout.

Look for the Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG “Royal” to release on April 1st at select Jordan Brand retailers. The retail price tag is set at $160 USD.

Air Jordan 10 Comparison: Orignal 1995 Vs 2015 Remastered

Remastered or (re) diculously priced ?

I used to be a huge Air Jordan 10 Collector up until 2005/2006 when retro quality quickly went downhill.  Glue spots galore, cheap materials, and sudden increases in prices really turned me off  so I was intrigued by the entire “remastered” idea. Was this an admission by Jordan Brand that they were making pure shit for the past ten years ? In my eyes, yes but we all know quality was not JBs top priority. To make amends, JB has promised better quality with an uptick in price. Let’s see how they compare.

Original 1995 Orlando Magic Jordan X DS

2015 Jordan X “Double Nickle” DS

MATERIALS

Leather quality appears almost identical to the originals. It seems more manufactured than the OG, meaning the OG pair had smooth, non textured spots whereas the retro looks exactly the same all the way around the shoe.

Above: retro, below OG

Materials get a thumbs up from me but the AJ X never got hit by the bad quality bug as bad as other retros such as the IV V and VI. I’ll see if I can find my other Air Jordan 14 Desert Sand from 2018.

STITCHING AND GLUE

Very happy to say my pair didn’t have any excess glue spots or poor stitching

Above: retro, notice how smooth the second (bottom) layer of leather is? Almost too smooth and fake looking  but that’s just me being nitpicky (compare to below)

below OG

MIDSOLE AND SOLE

Spot on again

TONGUE

OG 

Retro

The stamping on the retro jordans is actually more defined and clearer than the original.  The tongue’s material on the retro feels stiffer so maybe that’s why they were able to print it more clearly

BOXES

Nothing beats an OG box sorry lol

.

PRICING

The OG Aj X retailed for $125 20 years ago so taking inflation into account you get $192.

Although pricing is the same, Nike’s economy of scale has increased a lot so they are still making a lot more off these shoes than back in 1995.  In other words, Since they have grown so much in 20 years , production has increased , manufacturing is way more efficient and material prices have dropped since they buy so much more nowadays.

Overall though, as a big Aj collector, I can say that these remastered Aj Xs look and feel great, and are not over priced. If the rest of the remastered Jordans look like this I wouldn’t hesitate to buy them. Good job Jordan Brand !

Why the Remastered “Chicago” Jordan 1 is a Must-Have

It would not be hyperbolic—or, you know, wrong—to say that the Air Jordan 1 Chicago was the shoe that changed everything. In fact, if anything, that’s not saying enough. It would be more fair to say that the Air Jordan 1 started everything. It didn’t make Michael Jordan—he did that by himself—but it was there at the start as he, the Chicago Bulls, and Nike became juggernauts. The Air Jordan 1 wasn’t the first basketball sneaker, not by a long shot, but it was the first basketball sneaker that transcended basketball while it was still new. Designed in Portland, Ore. and worn in Chicago, it became a nationwide phenomenon before conquering the world.Let’s get more specific: This is about the red/black/white Air Jordan 1—the one that wasn’t banned. The black and red pair had its Letterman moment, but the red/black/white pair was the version Michael Jordan wore most often, from November ’84 in his rookie year, to April of ’86, when no less than Larry Bird called him “God disguised as Michael Jordan.”

The Air Jordan III (and designer Tinker Hatfield) gets credit for changing the course of signature sneakers, essentially birthing the concept, but the original Air Jordan 1 Homage to Home laid down the blueprint. The name, picked from a list presented by agent David Falk at the initial meeting, came before Jordan even signed. So did the original ball-and-wings logo, sketched on a napkin by then-Nike Creative Director Peter Moore on his flight back to Portland. “On the flight home I noticed a youngster wearing a replica pair of pilot’s wings given to him by the airlines,” Moore remembers. “The design seemed to fit the idea of a guy who could fly.”

The sneaker itself was based on what little input Jordan gave. “[Jordan] expressed the idea of having ‘something different, something exciting, and low to the ground,’” Moore says. “Those were the directives. I decided color would be the way to create something different and exciting. The colors were dictated by the Bulls colors, which were red, black, and white. That meant that we could have three colors on a single shoe, which in 1985 was unheard of in basketball shoes.”

Jordan famously derided those as “the devil’s colors”—those of UNC rival NC State—but no matter. The palette was set, and in the five months between their November appearance and their April launch, Nike and Jordan tirelessly marketed the shoe—Nike through ads, Jordan through his play. He appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated in December 1984 (his shoes unfortunately cropped out) and started the 1985 All-Star game, playing 22 minutes. He wore the black and red version of his shoe in the dunk contest, but wore the black, red, and white in the game.

POST CONTINUES BELOW

By the time the April ’85 release rolled around, the Air Jordan hype had reached a crescendo never before seen around a sneaker release. In New York City, 54 of 75 posters put up in bus stations were stolen. Some of the first resellers in history flipped their $65 Air Jordans for $100 right out of the store. Demand was insane.

“I wanted them so bad, but I didn’t have the cash and my mom was not laying out that kind of money for sneakers that I was going to grow out of in a year,” says MC Serch. “I decided that the only way to get the kicks was to get a job at a sneaker spot, and I did. I went to work for Morton’s Army Navy in Far Rockaway and saved up my dough—and by the time I had enough for them, I no longer wanted them.”

“I AM SOMEWHAT SURPRISED BY THE STAYING POWER OF THE JORDAN 1. IT SEEMS EVERY NEW GENERATION OF KIDS HAS TO TRY IT, ALMOST AS IF THEY DISCOVERED IT.”
—PETER MOORE

The Air Jordan 1 was still available because, despite the initial sell-through, there was a second wave. How big was Air Jordan? Jordan products alone accounted for $100 million in sales in 1985 after the company sold just $65 million in all its product in 1984. Forget Nike and Jordan himself for the moment; Air Jordan represented a huge windfall for retailers as well. And once the initial shipments sold out, they wanted more. Lots more.

“Trying to cool the fever was the hardest thing,” says Moore. “Especially with a company that was in need of a home run at the time. In the end, we made too many shoes and so the unsold inventory was discounted.”

Flooding the market hurt the bottom line initially, but in the long run it may have been the best thing for the Air Jordan line. The first Air Jordan literally remained on shelves for years, eventually reaching markets it was never intended for. They were still available, dirt cheap, when skateboarders were looking for durable alternatives to canvas Vans—even as Vans was trying to branch out of skateboarding.

“When [Vans] stopped giving us shoes altogether, we started wearing other shoes,” says legendary skater Steve Caballero. “I rode Converse for a while, I rode Nike Air Jordans, Puma Prowlers. I even tried the first Airwalks when Airwalk started in ’87.” For some, the Bones Brigade (Caballero and his Powell-Peralta teammates) endorsement became as important to Air Jordan as Jordan’s own.

“I skated in my Jordans in Washington Square Park one sleepy afternoon ’cause I thought it would be ill and they matched my Hosoi Hammerhead graphics,” says legendary hip-hop A&R Dante Ross, then a 19-year-old living in NYC’s Lower East Side. “They were and are still the best kicks to skate in.”

The Air Jordan 1 wound up everywhere, and in those days before retro, the overproduced, virtually indestructible Air Jordan 1 never entirely went away. Like Serch, I didn’t get a pair of Air Jordan 1s when they first released for the same reasons. Unlike Serch, I still wanted them. Five years later, I finally got them, when, as a college freshman, I came across a pair in a Newark, Del. Goodwill. They were two sizes too big and a bit battered, but I bought them—and wore them—anyway. That was 25 years ago, and I still have them. In fact, they’re the pair photographed for this story.

Since 1985, the white/black/red Air Jordan 1 has returned several times, starting in 1994. It remains the most universally wearable Air Jordan, one that resonates with fans both new and old. “I am somewhat surprised by the staying power of the Jordan 1,” Moore says. “It seems every new generation of kids has to try it, almost as if they discovered it. When I look at the shoe today I don’t see old, especially in the upper—the cup sole is the thing that dates it—but the upper is almost timeless at this point.”

And what sets it apart now—despite legions of imitators, some of which were introduced while the original Air Jordan was still on shelves—is what set it apart then. “The whole idea of the shoes was to bring color into basketball,” Moore says, “and Jordan, as it turned out, was the most colorful performer in the game.”

2001 vs. 2013 vs. 2017 Air Jordan 1 Retro ‘Royal’ Comparison

It’s only been four years since the last go-round, but the ‘Royal’ Air Jordan 1 Retro is one of the year’s most anticipated sneaker releases. Originally released in 1985, the black and blue colorway first returned in 2001, before a 12-year hiatus until the next retro. This time, Jordan Brand is promising remastered quality, which means they tried to construct it as close to the original as possible.To determine how well they did with the 2017 version, we compared every ‘Royal’ Air Jordan 1 Retro to date, breaking them down by each detail. Read on to see how this year’s release stacks up against its predecessors.

QUARTER

The leather is different on each pair and the shade of blue gradually got brighter. Unlike the 2013 and 2017 releases, nubuck fills the Swoosh of the 2001 retro.

TONGUE

The font used for Nike Air embroidery is different on each tongue, as is the material used to construct them.

LINING

There’s less padding on the 2013 retro compared to the 2001 and 2017 pairs, along with a different lining pattern. The backside of the tongue on the 2001 pair features the Jumpman logo and production number. Logo on the back of the tongue and lining color is white on the 2017 retro and black on the other two.

HEEL

Sizing of heel tabs varies each year. There’s no black stitching on the heel tab on the 2013 pair and the tab is a bit higher on this year’s retro. The 2013 pair appears to be more narrow when looking at it from behind when compared to the 2001 and 2017 pairs.

COLLAR

Note the size, shape and positioning of the Wings logo on each pair.

INSOLE

After the Jumpman graced the insoles of the 2001 Jordan retro, Nike Air returned in 2013 and again this year, but this time on OG-style white insoles.

TOEBOX

The size and arrangement of the perforations differ on each pair, as does the general narrowness of the toeboxes.

SHOE BOX

The 2001 release came with the ‘Jordan Face’ box, while the OG-style box returned for the 2013 and 2017 releases.

Comparing 2009 vs. 2016 Air Jordan 11 “Space Jam”

The highly-anticipated 2016 Air Jordan 11 Space Jam is slightly different from previous retro iterations, as this latest gallery showcases its comparison to the 2009 counterpart.

The good folks at jordans for all have provided detailed pics to express just that. For starters, the 2016 pair is simply more shoe. The midsole, patent leather mudguard and model cut are all slightly taller than that of its predecessor. By our estimates, the height of the 2016 version rates closer to the OG while the sleekness of the 2009 pair is more inline with the 1995 edition. Shaping aside, concord branding is featured on the ’16 release (an original detail) as is #45 heel tagging (also indicitave of the OG). With the 2016 version essentially staying true to its OG build, in which MJ first wore during the 1995 NBA Playoffs, the sneaker’s notable differential elements consists of a higher cut black patent leather overlay.

Furthermor Last but not least, the sole on the 2016 pair features a much more pronounced blue tint than that of the ’09 release, with the original version also appearing more blue when worn on court by MJ.
the 2016 edition will be packaged in a Looney Tunes themed box with special cartoon graphics to celebrate the film’s 20th anniversary.

Take a look at how the 2016 Space Jam 11s stack up against the 2009 retro in the gallery above, and set aside $110 if you’re planning to cop a pair when they return on today.

‘Banned’ Air Jordans have slightly different history than Nike’s narrative

Nike’s story of the black-and-red Air Jordan 1 makes for sexy marketing: When then-NBA commissioner David Stern saw Michael Jordan wearing the shoes in a 1984 preseason game, he banned them.

Nike and Jordan Brand are pumping that story line as they prepare for the Saturday release of the Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG Banned, a throwback to the classic that sneaker heads have nicknamed the “Bred.”

But the Bred was not the shoe that was banned. It was the Ship.

Let us explain.

Air Jordan sneaker design: A brief history
A brief history of the design inspiration behind Air Jordans.
As original Air Jordan logo designer Peter Moore recalls, Nike and Jordan’s marketing team at ProServ met that August in Washington, D.C., and planned the launch of his first shoe, but it wouldn’t be ready until November. Jordan needed something of Nike’s to wear during training camp and preseason and the brain trust wanted it to be red and black, as they intended the first shoe’s color scheme to be, to make him stand out from other players.

At the time, however, NBA shoes had to be mostly white, and Stern “banned the red and black because he proclaimed that the red and black were not the color of the Bulls — the shoes didn’t meet the uniform standard,” said Moore, who is now founder of What’a Ya Think, a Portland, Ore.-based. branding consulting company. “They were the colors of the Bulls, they just were lacking white, but you don’t argue with David Stern at that point.”

During the regular season, Jordan alternated between red-and-white Ships and Air Jordan 1 Retro Banned , nicknamed “Chicagos.”

So how have the red-and-black Ships and Breds come to be confused?

“The Air Ship was basically colored up to look like the shoe that was coming,” Moore said. “Those shoes were probably specially made for him to wear, and they were what his Air Jordans would look like once they came. Nobody would know the difference unless they had the shoes in front of them.”

The True Story Behind the Banned Air Jordan 1

We’ve been led to believe that the black and red colorway of the Air Jordan 1 was banned 31 years ago. But was it really? The Air Jordan 1 is a mysterious shoe that originally released in all sorts of colorways, and in order to gather the history and evolution of the brand, we must first look back at its roots.

As the story goes, Michael Jordan was, or would be fined, $5,000 per game if he wore a certain pair of red and black Nike basketball shoes, as evidenced by 2011’s “Banned” Air Jordan 1 High. Per the “uniformity of uniform rule” set by the NBA,

A player must wear shoes that not only matched their uniforms, but matched the shoes worn by their teammates.”

At the time, red and black was much more rebellious than plain black and white shoes, and first-year NBA commissioner David Stern “threw them out of the game.” Legend has it that MJ continued wearing the pair anyway, while Nike footed the bill. Does this story sound familiar to you? Let’s take a look at an interview conducted by legendary late night talk show host, David Letterman. Fast forward to 4:48.

Here is a letter written by then-NBA Executive Vice President, Russ Granik, addressed to Nike Vice President, Rob Strasser. It states that Michael Jordan wore a certain pair of Nike basketball shoes that violated the league’s rules and procedures on or around October 18, 1984.

There are so many questions to be asked. For one, how many games did MJ wear the Black/Red Air Jordan 1? And did Nike really pay said imposed fines? And here’s the biggest question: Was the Black/Red Air Jordan 1 even the right sneaker that was first “banned” by the NBA?

No, and here’s why.

I’ve had regular discussions with people on the matter. In particular, bigbostrong on Instagram, who has provided detailed pictures of Air Jordan history, as well as our friends from Australia, Adam Ryan and Aaron Stehn—both of whom who run a popular podcast on inallairness.com. A mutual colleague of theirs, Adam Howes, runs bullsonparade.me and does the same, but with all focus on the rich historical events of Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls history.

We have already scratched the surface as to what MJ first wore during his rookie campaign, which is identified as the Nike Air Ship—a mysterious shoe that has yet to be retroed. To my knowledge, Jordan wore three colorways of the Air Ship: White/Natural Grey, White/Red and Black/Red. And that Black/Red version of the Nike Air Ship is the actual sneaker that was banned, not the Air Jordan 1. Jordan did however had a PE edition of the Air Ship, which read “Air Jordan” on the heels.

Michael Jordan Air Ship

Close-up shot of the “Air Jordan” PE Air Ship – Image via Getty Bettmann / Contributor
Here is Michael in a 1984 preseason game against the New York Knicks wearing the Black/Red Nike Air Ship. The game was played on October 18, 1984 at Madison Square Garden. It was the 6th preseason game the Bulls had played, and they were going into the game with a 4-1 record. A few days earlier on October 15, 1984, the two teams played each other at Glens Falls, NY some 200 miles north of Madison Square Garden. The NBA notified Nike and/or the Bulls that the black and red sneaker from the October 18 game broke the “uniformity of uniform rule.” He would immediately have to stop wearing the colorway on court.

In this YouTube video, you can see Michael wearing the Black/Red Nike Air Ship during practice at Madison Square Garden from a interview conducted on October 18, 1984. Fast forward to 0:26. The game following is the regular season debut at Madison Square Garden on November 8, 1984 with Michael wearing the White/Red Nike Air Ship.

There have been no pictures surfaced of Michael Jordan ever wearing the Black/Red Air Jordan 1 in an NBA game. I’ve been analyzing this mythical story for a some years now, and have even challenged our Jordan forum to provide a picture and/or video of Michael wearing the shoes. I’ve been presented with all sorts of unique attempts such as the 1985 NBA Slam Dunk competition, to Patrick Ewing in a one-on-one match up, to screenshots of Michael from the “Just For Kicks” documentary of 2005.

Let’s break down each attempt. The 1985 NBA dunk contest doesn’t count since it wasn’t an NBA sanctioned game. It does however suggest that the NBA may have again warned the Bulls superstar and Nike for breaking the “uniformity of uniform rule.” Referencing back to the letter, it was dated February 25, 1985. All Star festivities began on the weekend of the 10th. It may suggest that a second warning did take place, but no evidence has surfaced regarding any imposed fines the NBA may have issued—something we can perhaps research at a later time.

The matchup between Jordans for all and Ewing was for the cover of the November 1985 issue of Inside Sports magazine, and utilized for promotion of the 1985-86 NBA season. It simulated the matchup between the previous Rookie of the Year (Jordan) versus the potential (and eventual) Rookie of the Year (Ewing). Jordan continued to wear the White/Red Air Jordan 1 in the 1985-86 NBA season, before and after his foot injury.

The documentary Just For Kicks again attempted to align the notion that Jordan was fined for wearing the shoes. But there has yet to be evidence by Nike or the NBA that proves that the violation ever took place. These screen captures from the documentary were modified. Photos of the game were taken from the first round of the 1986 NBA playoffs against the Boston Celtics in which Michael scored a playoff record 63 points. It still stands as a record today.

Keep in mind that the uniform style worn during Michael’s rookie season were different. The road jerseys consisted of black script lettering for Chicago along the chest and the home jerseys with the Bulls team name in red. After the 1984-85 NBA season, the Bulls sported a new uniform style which is similar to what Jordan wore throughout his illustrious career.

So there you have it—the true story behind of the actual “banned” sneaker. It was not the Air Jordan 1 banned , but indeed the Nike Air Ship in the Black/Red colorway. Perhaps someday we’ll come to understand how Nike strategically rolled out the “banned” campaign. We can only wonder if we’ll ever get a retro of the Nike Air Ship—which seems like a possiblity after it was finally offically acknowledged by Jordan Brand in 2014.

Whether or not the Air Jordan 1 was banned, the myth is most definitely a part of sneaker history, and the precursor to what Jordan Brand is today.

Air Jordan 1 Banned VS Chicago,Which is better?

As two kinds of popular sneakers of Air  Jordan, Air Jordan 1 Banned and the Air Jordan 1 Chicago , which is better ?

So let us look the details as below :

Jordan Brand unveils this insane Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG “Homage To Home” Sample that combines the famed “Banned” and “Chicago” colorways into one cohesive sneaker. The shoes are split down the tongue, with the “Banned” color owning the lateral side and the “Chicago” on the medial. This may remind you of the Air Jordan 1 “Quai 54” Friends and Family that was revealed during the big event in Paris.

jordan Brand is bringing the correct heat to the green with the release of the Air Jordan 1 Retro High Golf Shoe. We first saw a similar sample leaked by MJ’s son Marcus, but with official images now live, it appears that a release is near – potentially closer to late Spring. This familiar “Chicago” colorway has some differences from the basketball original, like the “Nike” Wings logo, the larger Jumpman on the tongue, and of course, the new outsole fit for the green.

With the Retro prices at an all-time high, consumers have stopped consuming most Retro releases on Saturday in hopes that they grab a grail, or strike it big with a Retro that will fetch them a high resell profit. That shoe looks to be the ‘Banned’ Air Jordan 1, even though Jordan Brand has proven that it will release the shoe every 3 or so years.

However ,   Air Jordan 1 Chicago also  become the most popular  shoes since it released .To the uninitiated, they may look like the same shoe. Ask the average sneakerhead, and they’ll tell you the difference is the midsole — the 1.5 “The Return” swaps the original rubber tooling for the Air Jordan 2’s polyurethane setup. But take a closer look and you’ll find that that’s only the beginning.

So which one will  you choose ?


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