Archivo para la categoría ‘adidas Harden Vol 2’

adidas harden vol 2 red white performance review

The Harden Vol 2 is a nice basketball shoe off the court, but it did not impress me on the court.

Let’s cut straight to the chase: the traction on the Harden Vol 2 let your boy down something fierce. The traction performed well right out of the box…for about two days.

After the rubber breaks in the traction will decline full speed ahead. On dirty courts, I was wiping more than I like to, and these things pick up dust like nobody’s business. The traction had me out there like I was competing in the Winter Olympics – figure skating style.

On a clean court, the traction was solid. As long as the court conditions are good you will be fine.

I’m sure you guys already know what I’m about to say right? You guessed it: Booost is life…well, a different life, because this setup is a bit different from other Boost basketball shoes.

This year, a much thicker piece of Boost is implemented in the Harden Vol 2. However, don’t expect this thicker boost to be as bouncy as other performance models that we’ve dealt with before. I am not saying the Boost isn’t good, it is, I’m just that it seems like adidas went with a more impact protection focused setup this year. It was great for impact protection and I’d like to see this setup on more releases in the future.

Materials are pretty basic on the Harden Vol 2. ForgeFiber, a reinforced textile mesh is used at the forefoot while synthetic paneling makes up the rear. The mesh gets its strength from TPU-coated fibers, and they add support to the mesh — it does a great job at containing the foot. While the materials are pretty basic — it’s all synthetic here — they keep the weight of the upper down.

The fit on the Harden Vol 2 is true to size. Wide-footers may be able to go true to size but I would try on in-store. The shoe fits pretty snug and at the midfoot there’s an elastic-like band that may cause discomfort for some people. It is also an ounce heavier than the Harden Vol 1 (just a note for people that prefer lightweight

Support on James Harden’s second signature was pretty good. With an outrigger that is as wide and as thick as the one used here you’re bound to get good support. The wide base here is like standing on a plank of Boost foam.

The one-piece bootie does a great job at containing the foot while providing you with a compression-like feel — I love how these felt on-foot. The mesh was strong enough to support every move I made on the court and keep me atop the footbed with no issues.

I did have a bit of an issue with the heel lockdown, but once I customized the lacing system to my liking — those holes aren’t for decoration — I was able to get my heel locked into the back of the shoe.

Unless you play on crispy clean courts the Harden Vol 2 Red White isn’t a shoe that I would recommend people buy because there are a bunch of better options on the market. The traction was just too inconsistent for me to enjoy in these.

However, I do recommend this Harden if you want to rock something swaggy with tons of Boost. I think it looks incredible worn casually.

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adidas Harden Vol 2 performance review

The next chapter of James Harden’s signature line has been put to the test and that means that the adidas Harden Vol 2 performance review is finally here.

Unfortunately, the traction on the Harden Vol 2 just wasn’t as good as that of the original. A re-engineered rendition of the Harden Vol 1’s data-driven pattern was utilized in the Harden Vol 2 and it didn’t pan out the way I had hoped.

I never received the same bite that I had experienced on the Harden Vol 1, despite the rubber compound being nearly identical between the two sneakers. When it gripped I was very pleased, however, I wasn’t pleased the majority of the time while playing in the shoe.

Excessive dust collection is a major issue for this pattern and keeping it free of debris will be your number one priority on the court rather than playing. Even in an NBA practice facility — a nearly pristine court — I wasn’t getting much bite and I always felt like I was going to slip if I put too much pressure on an area of the outsole with the compacted pattern.

I was pretty disappointed in this category because I loved the Harden Vol 1, but I can’t say the same for the Harden Vol 2 — and it was one of my most anticipated sequels to a great first model.

Boost is back and thicker than ever before on the Harden Vol 2. Surprisingly, I never felt too high off the ground or unstable. Packing more Boost pellets into the midsole made it firmer, creating more stability while also increasing overall impact protection.

Some may not enjoy this setup because it won’t give you that bouncy Boost feeling, but you don’t always have to feel something working — as long as it actually works. Luckily, Boost actually works, and works really well, so if you were interested in a shoe that provides you with stability, court feel, and tons of impact protection then the Harden Vol 2 might be for you.

While I was initially disappointed that a premium or raw material was left off of the Harden Vol 2, once I started playing in it I never once thought, “Some premium leather would enhance my overall experience right now.”

The textile mesh at the forefoot required no break-in time while the additional stitching throughout increased the material’s strength quite a bit. I was very impressed by this and wondered why we’re just starting to see this implemented when we’ve had mesh on basketball shoes for a number of years now. Great work by adidas for adding this onto the mesh.

It’ll be interesting to see how this material wears long term because I’ve seen so many players with a ripped lateral forefoot on their engineered mesh sneakers. If this small modification allows the upper’s material to last the life of the shoe then it’s a worthy addition.

I know most have been unimpressed by the synthetic rear panel of the shoe, but it works on-court so I can’t complain. Yes, I’d love for this panel to be where the raw materials seen in the first model are brought into the mix, but this is what we have to work with. This panel is very strong and durable so containment isn’t an issue. Longevity shouldn’t be an issue either.

So, while you may be disappointed by the materials used, you shouldn’t be disappointed by their performance.

True to size. Wide footers, try them on in-store and then shop online. There is an elastic-like band where the mesh and synthetic layer meet that doesn’t stretch much. I love how it fits and feels, but wide footers and those with high arches may not. For everyone else, I love the fit going true to size.

Lockdown was really good as well, and it was a tad better than lockdown in the Harden Vol 1. The rear panel is strong and wraps around the midfoot nicely. Meanwhile, that band I mentioned (where the two materials meet) keeps the forefoot snug and secure.

The internal bootie feels like neoprene and acts like one as well; you can feel it wrapped around your heel and ankle — but not in a suffocating way. It’s somewhat like the Dame 4’s compression collar but stretchier, so it’s easier to get on and off, and it’s able to adapt a bit to different heel/ankle shapes and sizes.

The Harden Vol 2 Red was very supportive despite riding so high off the floor in the heel. Its Boost platform is very wide and you actually sit within it just a bit so you never really feel as high off the ground as you actually are. The TPU-wrapped forefoot ensured the Boost’s stability in this section while also acting as an outrigger.

At the heel, there is a very strong internal heel counter and that large exaggerated rubber piece from the outsole; these make the heel one of the most supportive aspects of the shoe. Lastly, the torsional plate is alive and well and even extends into the forefoot to act as a TPU spring plate. For a Guard shoe, the support is here and shouldn’t let you down.

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